Getting your Indian tourist visa

Getting an Indian tourist visa is a much simpler affair with the new e-Tourist Visa, if you are eligible. Find more information on the government of India’s e-Tourist Visa website. Beware of fake websites offering the e-TV service. The correct website is: https://indianvisaonline.gov.in/.

For UK citizens, the Indian High Commission website provides further helpful information.

Here's what else you need to know ...

WEATHER

Spring and autumn are the best times of year in India. Most of the country is uncomfortably hot from May to August, with monsoon rains often causing havoc in June and July. The northern parts of India can be chilly in January and February. Up in the high Himalayas, the tourist season is reversed, with summer being the only season in which many of the roads are snow-free and passable.

 

MONEY

Most foreign bank cards work in India, but don’t be surprised if ATMs are regularly out of order. In very remote regions, make sure to have enough cash on you as ATMs are scarce. Larger bank branches in main cities usually have a foreign exchange counter, and big hotels will change foreign currency from the major world currencies.

 

CURRENCY

The Indian currency is the Rupee.

US$1 = approx. 67 Rupees.

 

HEALTH & HYGIENE

We recommend taking out travel and medical insurance before travelling.

Make sure your vaccinations, including but not limited to cholera, hepatitis A, polio and typhoid, are up to date before travelling to India.

Poor hygiene conditions are an unfortunate fact of life in India, and traveller’s diahrrhea is common. Read this article on health tips for travelling in India, how to reduce your chances of coming down with “Delhi belly” and advice on how to treat it.

 

FOOD & DRINK

Indian food is varied and generally enjoyable. Most restaurants will cater to palates less used to fire by making less spicy dishes.

Vegetarians will have no trouble as vegetarianism has been prevalent in India for centuries. Indian chefs are very used to cooking for those with restricted diets so vegans will find India much easier to travel in than other countries.

Meat eaten in India includes chicken, mutton, fish and seafood. We generally recommend those with delicate constitutions to avoid fish or seafood.

Strictly avoid drinking anything but bottled water, which is safe and readily available.

 

LOOS

Most Burrows&Bird hotels have Western-style loos, although in very remote parts of the country, facilities can be primitive.

Many facilities at tourist spots, and most bathrooms at petrol stations, are squat loos.

Public toilets do not provide toilet paper; toilet paper is generally disposed of in waste baskets rather than flushed; loos in India tend to be places where one would not choose to linger.

 

BRING WITH YOU

A few packs of tissues for public loos.

Suncreen – India can have plenty of sunshine.

Sunglasses – as above.

Mosquito repellent.

A couple of multi-plug adaptors – plugs in India are confoundingly varied.

 

DON’T BRING WITH YOU

Any illegal drugs.

 

WHAT TO WEAR – WOMEN

Opt for cotton, or other natural fabrics that are breathable in warmer weather.

Comfortable walking shoes with a good grip are a must.

A pair of rubber flip flops for hotel bathrooms, which are often “wet rooms”.

Hat for sun protection.

Avoid wearing short shorts or skirts above the knee; most women feel more comfortable in lightweight trousers or midi to ankle-length skirts.

Avoid revealing too much cleavage; at Burrows&Bird we also recommend leaving singlets at home.

Indian-Glenburn-bangles

 

WHAT TO WEAR – MEN

Opt for cotton, or other natural fabrics that are breathable in warmer weather.

Comfortable walking shoes with a good grip are a must.

A pair of rubber flip flops for hotel bathrooms, which are often “wet rooms”.

Hat for sun protection.